home Vans Sounds of the Sixties – Colston Hall, Bristol 1968

Sounds of the Sixties – Colston Hall, Bristol 1968

A few nice hippie van life images I found:

Sounds of the Sixties – Colston Hall, Bristol 1968
hippie van life
Image by brizzle born and bred
The Small Faces

Small Faces on Swedish TV with one of their greatest songs.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkgAwQadSHI

Canned Heat

Canned Heat is an American blues/boogie rock band that formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1965.

The group has been noted for its own interpretations of blues material as well as for efforts to promote the interest in this type of music and its original artists.

It was launched by two blues enthusiasts, Alan Wilson and Bob Hite, who took the name from Tommy Johnson’s 1928 "Canned Heat Blues", a song about an alcoholic who had desperately turned to drinking Sterno, generically called "canned heat". After appearances at Monterey and Woodstock, at the end of the 1960s the band acquired worldwide fame with a lineup consisting of Bob Hite, vocals, Alan Wilson, guitar, harmonica and vocals, Henry Vestine (or Harvey Mandel) on lead guitar, Larry Taylor on bass, and Adolfo de la Parra on drums.

The music and attitude of Canned Heat afforded them a large following and established the band as one of the popular acts of the hippie era. Canned Heat appeared at most major musical events at the end of the 1960s and they were able to deliver on stage electrifying performances of blues standards and their own material and occasionally to indulge into lengthier ‘psychedelic’ solos.

Two of their songs – "Going Up the Country" and "On the Road Again" – became international hits. "Going Up the Country" was a remake of the Henry Thomas song "Bulldoze Blues" recorded in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1927. "On the Road Again" was a cover version/re-working of the 1953 Floyd Jones song of the same name, which is reportedly based on the Tommy Johnson song "Big Road Blues" recorded in 1928.

Canned Heat line-up, who together recorded some of the band’s most famous and well-regarded songs. During this "classic" period, Skip Taylor and John Hartmann introduced the use of band member nicknames:

Arriving via helicopter at Woodstock, Canned Heat played their most famous set on the second day of the festival at sunset. The set included "Going Up the Country" which became the title track in the documentary, even though the band’s performance was not shown. The song was included in the first (triple) Woodstock album; while the second album, Woodstock 2, contained "Woodstock Boogie". The expanded 25th Anniversary Collection added "Leaving This Town" to the band’s collection of Woodstock performances and "A Change Is Gonna Come" was included on the director’s cut of the documentary film; leaving only "Let’s Work Together" to be released.

Bob "The Bear" Hite

On April 5, 1981, during a break between sets at The Palomino Club in North Hollywood, Hite was handed a drug vial by a fan. Thinking it contained cocaine, Hite stuck a straw into the vial and snorted it. The drug turned out to be heroin and Hite turned blue and collapsed. Some roadies put Hite in the band’s van, and drove him to a nearby home where he died of an overdose.

Alan "Blind Owl" Wilson

Wilson died in Topanga Canyon, California at age 27. After an autopsy, his death was listed as acute barbiturate intoxication.

Although Wilson had reportedly attempted suicide before and his death is sometimes reported as a suicide, this is not clearly established and he left no note.

Wilson was interested in preserving the natural world, particularly the redwood trees. When he died so too did the Music Mountain organization he had initiated dedicated to this purpose. In order to support his dream, Wilson’s family has purchased a “grove naming” in his memory through the Save the Redwood League of California. The money gifted to create this memorial will be used by the League to support redwood reforestation, research, education, and land acquisition of both new and old growth redwoods.

Henry "Sunflower" Vestine (and later Harvey "The Snake" Mandel)

Harvey Mandel (born March 11, 1945, in Detroit, Michigan, United States) is an American guitarist known for his innovative approach to electric guitar playing. A professional at twenty, he played with Charlie Musselwhite, Canned Heat, The Rolling Stones, and John Mayall before starting a solo career. Mandel is one of the first rock guitarists to use two-handed fretboard tapping.

Larry "The Mole" Taylor

Larry ″The Mole″ Taylor (born Samuel Taylor; June 26, 1942) is an American bass guitarist, best known for his work as a member of Canned Heat from 1967. Before joining Canned Heat he had been a session bassist for The Monkees and Jerry Lee Lewis. He is the younger brother of Mel Taylor, long-time drummer for The Ventures.

Adolfo "Fito" de la Parra

Adolfo "Fito" de la Parra (born 8 February 1946, Mexico City) is a Mexican drummer, best known as a longtime member of Canned Heat.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=3doBiU6nN0k

Tim Rose

Timothy Alan Patrick Rose (September 23, 1940 – September 24, 2002), best known professionally as Tim Rose, was an American singer-songwriter, who spent much of his life in London, England and had more success in Europe than in his native country. Known for his gruff voice, Rose was often compared to Ray Charles, Rod Stewart and Joe Cocker.

In 2002, Rose had completed a successful tour of Ireland with cowriter and guitarist Mickey Wynne and had a number of gigs planned around the UK. He died at Middlesex Hospital, London of a heart attack during a second operation for a lower bowel problem on September 24, 2002 at age 62. He is buried in Brompton Cemetery, London.

He had no children. A number of posthumous recordings featuring Rose have since been released.

He was the subject of BBC programme Heir Hunters in November 2011, where investigators look for descendants of deceased people who didn’t leave a will.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=x81dU8fEFpw

The Nice

The Nice were an English progressive rock band from the 1960s, known for their blend of rock, jazz and classical music. Their debut album, The Thoughts of Emerlist Davjack was released in 1967 to immediate acclaim. It is sometimes considered the first progressive rock album. The Nice are also a forerunner of the much more widely known Emerson, Lake & Palmer.

The Nice consisted initially of keyboardist Keith Emerson, bassist/vocalist Lee Jackson, guitarist David O’List, more commonly known as "Davy", and drummer Ian Hague, quickly replaced by Brian Davison. The band took their name from Steve Marriott’s slang term for being high, a term he used in the song "Here Come the Nice". Marriott originally wanted to give the name to a band he was producing, called The Little People. Andrew Loog Oldham took it upon himself to rename The Little People Apostolic Intervention, and dubbed the Emerson, Jackson, Davison, O’List group "The Nice". Emerson’s autobiography Pictures of an Exhibitionist suggests that the name originated with a suggestion from P. P. Arnold. The reference to "being high" is not mentioned, instead a routine by hipster/comic Lord Buckley is quoted.

By 1970, Emerson and the other band members were frustrated with their lack of mainstream success and they soon broke up. They played their last concert on 30 March 1970 in Berlin, Germany (Sportpalast). Emerson formed a band with Greg Lake (of King Crimson) and Carl Palmer (of Atomic Rooster) — Emerson, Lake & Palmer.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=45pIvr4gJD4